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Author Topic: External Oblique
DVST8NG
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posted 06-14-2005 07:49 PM     Profile for DVST8NG     Send New Private Message   Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote
Has anyone found an External Oblique to cause a posterior rotation of the hip?
Posts: 87 | From: Grande Prairie, Alberta | Registered: Jan 2003  |  IP: Logged
Jon O
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posted 06-15-2005 09:04 PM     Profile for Jon O   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message   Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote
Can't say that I have, but could that happen to someone who does a lot of golfing?
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DVST8NG
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posted 06-16-2005 11:45 AM     Profile for DVST8NG     Send New Private Message   Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote
funny you should say that because those are the people that i have been working on with tight external obliques and posteriorly rotated pelvises!!! coincidence? i think not....
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Louis
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posted 06-16-2005 05:16 PM     Profile for Louis   Author's Homepage     Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote
What? External oblique causing posterior pelvis rotation? Where are the external obliques and what are their function?

Sorry muscles pull not push!

Try hamstrings and rectus abdominus!


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DVST8NG
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posted 06-16-2005 06:59 PM     Profile for DVST8NG     Send New Private Message   Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote
uhh, YEAH i have looked at the hamstrings and abdominals!!!! Didn't go through crazy amounts of hours of schooling and extra credit courses in the last how many years to not have learnt the basics... That is why i am wondering if anyone has ever heard of the POSSIBLITY of external obliques causing such a rotation. You know... exploring different possiblities? Perhaps looking outside the box one would say.

The two clients that i have with similair issues are quite flexible in both the hamstrings and the abs, but the common denominator is they both have restrictions in their external obliques, both golfers.


Posts: 87 | From: Grande Prairie, Alberta | Registered: Jan 2003  |  IP: Logged
Louis
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posted 06-16-2005 07:32 PM     Profile for Louis   Author's Homepage     Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote
Then I take it that working hamstrings and abdominals has not relieved the discomfort and you don't know yet whether working the external obliques has helped. Or are you trying to correct a postural defect? More info!

Avid golfer? How many times a week or day? (Ha)

Pain level or not?

How about this for thinking outside the box for massage therapists... If this is an avid golfer for quite a while chances are to change a "rotation" of the pelvis that swinging a golf club might cause may very well be a muscular imbalance that may only be corrected by strengthening the opposing muscles.


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beamer5000
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posted 06-29-2005 11:28 PM     Profile for beamer5000     Send New Private Message   Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote
DVST8--
I'm wondering first of all how you are coming to the conclusion that the pelvis is rotated posteriorly? To what degree are you performing the postural assessment? Just curious.

You also said that person has

"have restrictions in their external obliques,"....I'm not sure what that means either. ROM restrictions, as in rotational restrictions? Or are you palpating something that you are calling a restriction?

As far as the posterior pelvic tilt is concerned, I'm going to veer off onto a different direction all together. There is a posterior pelvic tilt and then there is a situation where the femurs are being pulled anteriorly. It looks like a posterior pelvic tilt but it is something different all together. It is my belief that a posterior pelvic tilt is not that common, but that femurs being pulled anteriorly is quite common.

People with a posterior pelvic tilt are a little harder to work with in my opinion. But folks with anterior femurs mainly need alot of iliacus type work--at it's attachment on the femur and the whole anterior hip superior and inferior of the iguinal ligament.

Now, I hear the protest, that I'm talking about anterior tilt/rotation muscles. But, I will fist fight anyone who tries to tell me that iliacus is in any kind of mechanical position to anteriorly tilt the pelvis. It can flex the hip, but it cannot bring the pelvis forward toward the femurs. Psoas can anteriorly tilt the pelvis indirectly because of it's attachment on the lumbar vertebrae.

And let me tell you, your guy ain't going to be able to swing a club if his abs are tight enough to be causing a posterior tilt of his pelvis.

*If I don't get back to any replies, it's not cause I don't want to debate, it's because my computer died and I'm just checking email here and there for a while.

Brenda


Posts: 296 | From: WA | Registered: Dec 2001  |  IP: Logged

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