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Author Topic: Tenderness after massage?
Lucky
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posted 11-29-2004 11:50 AM     Profile for Lucky     Send New Private Message   Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote
I am looking for a clinical answer as to why patients sometimes endure tenderness on the muscles 1-3 days after massage work. I know it is partly due to the movement of the muscle groups but I still am unclear on what "clinically" causes the ache. Perhaps it is because the manipulation circulates or frees the lactic acid and free radicals which can trigger pain receptors....? I am unsure and would like to have a true answer to this so I don't sound like an idiot! ;-) Please help! Thanks
jenlusko@comcast.net

Posts: 5 | From: annapolis, MD | Registered: Nov 2004  |  IP: Logged
MT Gal
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posted 11-29-2004 12:26 PM     Profile for MT Gal     Send New Private Message   Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote
In my experience, clients don't usually notice aches or stiffness after massage, but occasionally experience some tenderness in the muscles that were achy and stiff before massage. I usually warn clients that although they should feel an increased ROM, they may feel a slight tenderness, especially at attachments. My understanding of this tenderness has always been that the muscles may be slightly bruised, especially if they were very hypertonic--but that slight bruising is part of how we can get blood back into the muscles that are most likely dehydrated before the client gets on the table.

I guess this isn't really helping the question of aches or stiffness--unless that includes this tenderness I am thinking of...hopefully someone else has a better explaination!


Posts: 68 | From: Missoula, MT | Registered: Oct 2004  |  IP: Logged
Lucky
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posted 11-29-2004 02:27 PM     Profile for Lucky     Send New Private Message   Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote
Thanx MT Gal! ;-)

I meant tenderness (not muscle ache) now that I reread and hence edited my question, thanks! So to be clear, does the massage manipulation cause the bruising or are you saying the patient's sore muscles already have bruising even before they get massage therapy and the massage then brings the blood back into the muscle cells?

Thanx!


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Jon O
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posted 11-30-2004 01:18 AM     Profile for Jon O   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message   Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote
There are some people who are just more sensitive then others. Some people can take a lot of deep pressure with very little tenderness reported after, others may have extreme tenderness following a light massage. Sometimes it can get better with more massage work. Sometimes it may be like a minor grade fibromyalgia that may never improve. It is almost impossible to predetermine who will feel sore following a massage therapy treatment.
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MT Gal
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posted 11-30-2004 11:13 PM     Profile for MT Gal     Send New Private Message   Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote
My understanding is that massage causes a slight bruising, or something like bruising, to the muscles that are hypertonic, which leads to the tenderness. I beleive that part of bruising is having more blood than normal in the area...but would have to look back at some notes to be sure.

I also must agree with Jon...there is just no way to know. The most common places of tenderness I have heard about are in the rhomboids, pecs, deep hip rotators and trapezius. Often, I have clients who are petite women complaining of "shoulder pain"--really they have what I have come to consider "chronic American computer posture"--and I can dig in and they cannot get enough. I warn them about tenderness, especially in the occiput area, and rarely hear anything about it later. Just today, however, I had a client who was a large retired male, and I just couldn't feel like I was getting in on his back at all, his fascia was so thick. Then he tells me that when he came to see me about a month ago he was sore for a week! He still came back, so I'm not worried...as long as people feel they have just as much ROM if not more than before, I feel the tenderness is something the body must need.
Jen B.


Posts: 68 | From: Missoula, MT | Registered: Oct 2004  |  IP: Logged
Lucky
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posted 12-01-2004 08:56 AM     Profile for Lucky     Send New Private Message   Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote
Thank you both. We did not learn abt the bruising aspect for some reason so that makes sense. After 2 years of Massage School, I never did have a clear clinical answer as to why tenderness can ensue and it never came up in discussion. Hence, it has been on my "to research" list for some time! If I hear/learn anything more on this subject I will post it.

Be Well!

Jennifer


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allhands
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posted 12-01-2004 05:24 PM     Profile for allhands     Send New Private Message   Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote
I explain to the client that during a deep tissue massage the techniques I use may cause some inflammation. Due to the stripping and cross fiber you are breaking up the adhesions (adheared muscle fibers). This will cause some temporary inflammation which results in the tender feeling afterwards. I tell them that they may feel bruised, but they will not see a bruise and that it usually happens the day after the massage. That this is normal to the process and that overall they should feel better.
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palpateit
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posted 12-08-2004 01:33 PM     Profile for palpateit     Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote
No one knows really what goes on after deep massage so bruising is correct, in a way. Bruising is breakage of capillaries and leakage of blood. But one can have soreness - such as delayed onset muscle sorenes from exercise - without breakage of capillaries. Post massage soreness is due damage, and may or may not involve leakage of capillaries and obvious signs of edema.

Damage of what? Certainly the fascia, which surrounds each and every muscle cell. Probably involves tearing of the collagen. Perhaps breakage of muscle cell membranes and stuff leaking from the cells. And of course breaking capillaries, and or, tearing nerve endings, or lymphatics, or....

The Damage we do results in release of chemicals - not necessarily inflammatory chemicals - which irritate pain sensors.
Of course, all pain sensors are imbedded in the fascia, so all pain we experience arises from the fascia.

Pain does arise from relaeased toxins (where are they hiding??), nor from lactic acid. Two myths that contimue to be perpetuated.


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Gayle
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posted 12-16-2004 08:52 PM     Profile for Gayle     Send New Private Message   Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote
On this subject.... I just had a massage Sat because of some pain under my left shoulder blade. Sat night the pain became worse - and Sunday morning I COULD NOT MOVE!! I have never experienced that kind of pain before! I couldn't even sit down - I just walked around the living room and cried all day. This is not the first massage that I've had - and I've never experienced this. It was a deep tissue - but I've had deeper. The pain was completely gone in about 2 days. Does anyone have any idea what caused this?

Thanks!


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weeks
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posted 12-17-2004 12:56 AM     Profile for weeks   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message   Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote
.

Pain does arise from relaeased toxins (where are they hiding??), nor from lactic acid. Two myths that contimue to be perpetuated.[/QB][/QUOTE]


Of course you meant pain DOES NOT arise.....
interesting observations...


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Nurturing Hands Massage
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posted 12-17-2004 07:47 AM     Profile for Nurturing Hands Massage   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message   Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote
Hey Gail:
Could it have been an emotional release? Sometimes the pain comes to a head (so to speak) before the true healing begins. Just a thought. Yours in Health Judy

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