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Author Topic: massage post hip replacement
carolyn bc
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Member # 1927

posted 03-23-2006 02:02 AM     Profile for carolyn bc     Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote
I am a massage therapy student looking for some advice/info on treating recipients of total hip replacement. Specific techniques and special considerations would be appreciated.
Posts: 1 | From: Victoria | Registered: Mar 2006  |  IP: Logged
eclaire
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posted 06-01-2006 10:55 PM     Profile for eclaire     Send New Private Message   Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote
Hi, I am a certified athletic trainer and have worked a little with hip replacement pts. My first suggestion would be to communicate with their Physical Therapist. Second, massage wise, I would work a lot on quads and hamstrings because during sugery many muscles are cut and manipulated. Possible gentle strokes over hip and glutes with constant PT. FEEDBACK! ROM (range of motion) is excellent, but be careful. Maybe search google for hip replacement surgery and you might see exactly which muscles are effected. Hope this helps.
Posts: 6 | From: North Carolina | Registered: Jun 2006  |  IP: Logged
flsoutullo
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posted 08-06-2006 01:10 AM     Profile for flsoutullo   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message   Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote
quote:
Originally posted by carolyn bc:
I am a massage therapy student looking for some advice/info on treating recipients of total hip replacement. Specific techniques and special considerations would be appreciated.

A treatment for a Hip replacment is mostly rehabilitation work,but you can help with lymphatic drainage to help reduce inner inflamtion and to prevent tissue adherence as well as to massage the area around the scar to improve tissue flexibility if the scar is already healed and healthy,here work only superficial but make sure is a hip replacment and that there are not screws or osteosintesis involved.
I hope it help .
Fernando Soutullo RPT

Posts: 2 | From: Florida | Registered: Aug 2006  |  IP: Logged
flsoutullo
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Member # 2029

posted 08-06-2006 01:13 AM     Profile for flsoutullo   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message   Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote
quote:
Originally posted by carolyn bc:
I am a massage therapy student looking for some advice/info on treating recipients of total hip replacement. Specific techniques and special considerations would be appreciated.
Sorry I forgot to tell you that you can work in gluteals muscles group too but be gentle after a surgery all muscles are weaker and athrofic, and dont work mobilization unless you have proper advise and supervision from a professional PT in your area.

Posts: 2 | From: Florida | Registered: Aug 2006  |  IP: Logged
Jon O
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Member # 5

posted 08-07-2006 06:00 PM     Profile for Jon O   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message   Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote
What about pre-operative massage? A regular client is going for the surgery, hopefully by next spring (long wait lists here). She is seeing me monthly now and may come weekly in the month previous to the surgery.

This is a very healthy, very active lady who has been devastated by the pain of her condition (osteoarthritis). She started coming for the relaxation benefit, but now realizes the therapeutic side of massage therapy.


Posts: 708 | From: Manitoba, Canada | Registered: Nov 1999  |  IP: Logged
FernandoPT
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Member # 2082

posted 09-16-2006 02:57 AM     Profile for FernandoPT   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message   Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote
Hi
Basically pre-op for therapy is with excercise to build muscles that will be affected by the surgery but
it is important to work Soft Mobilizations in that area as well as massage in the entire muscles chain gluteals femorals hamstrings and entire lower extremity.
You can always contact me at :
admin@onlinemassagetechniques.com


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Posts: 4 | From: Hallandale FL | Registered: Sep 2006  |  IP: Logged
JeAnne
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posted 09-18-2006 05:57 PM     Profile for JeAnne   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message   Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote
As for post-op, perhaps this was what a neurologist I know would refer to as "a fluke" but there is a such thing as keeping the muscles too lax. Long story short (besides, I don't have details; I heard about this second hand from fellow bodyworker) after hip replacement, a massage client's new joint disarticulated. Her physician didn't say "no massage" but did say "it doesn't need to be that loose."

(Personally, I wonder what was done to enable the hip to become disjointed.)


Posts: 252 | From: Charlottesville, VA, USA | Registered: Nov 1999  |  IP: Logged
kaelyn
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Member # 1868

posted 02-08-2007 07:42 PM     Profile for kaelyn   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message   Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote
If you're a student, you should not be working on a recent post-op without supervision, end of story. If you're jsut doing "regualr massage", you should be going lightly post-op, and avoiding the surgery area. For more specific work, any regular therapist working with someone under 3 months post-op should be in touch with and have clearance from the surgeon, and have read the surgeon's notes. There are MANY things,such as ligamentous laxity, higher incidence of osteoporosis than expected, and a difficulty re-attaching ligaments and tendons that are only found out from the surgeon. These things directly impact if and when massage should begin, and at what level. IF you're properly qualified, using lymphatic drainage post surgery will help reduce swelling and pain. Anything else must depend on exactly what happened in the surgery, as well as the age and condition of the client. Refer this client to the appropriate practitioner.

As for my own qualifications, I'm nationally certified in Medical Massage, I've been doing injury and surgical re-hab for 22 years.


Posts: 5 | From: Greensboro, NC | Registered: Jan 2006  |  IP: Logged
Jon O
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Member # 5

posted 03-01-2007 12:12 PM     Profile for Jon O   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message   Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote
Well my client had her surgery and is very happy with the results. I saw her about 6 weeks post, and did mainly relaxation for back and neck (her request). She did not want me, or anyone else touching her new joint or anywhere near the incision site. Next visit will be more specfic to quads, hams, glutes etc.

As far as getting info from the surgeon regarding what was done exactly, it is like pulling teeth from a hen through the back end. This client of mine is an RN with many years emergency room duty and she couldn't get any info from the surgeon. She is also a very determined person when it comes to getting what she wants. Pre-op the surgeon told her to stop researching on the internet and just go with "What I Tell You", or find another surgeon. He is reportedly one of the best in the city and once a surgery is scheduled, you don't want to mess with it as you might have to wait another 6 mo or more to re-schedule!


Posts: 708 | From: Manitoba, Canada | Registered: Nov 1999  |  IP: Logged
weeks
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posted 03-01-2007 09:24 PM     Profile for weeks   Author's Homepage     Send New Private Message   Edit/Delete Post   Reply With Quote
Hey Jon O

If this is the client that received pre op massage, I'm interested in hearing more of your observations pre and post massage.


Posts: 618 | From: Kailua-Kona, HI | Registered: Jan 2000  |  IP: Logged

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